Making Secret Recordings At Work Could Land Employees In Hot Water

Modern smart phones make it easy to record voice memos on the fly, capture videos of memorable events, and document almost every minute detail of your day. However, as the Court of Queen’s Bench of Manitoba outlined in a recent decision, one place where cell phone recordings may not be welcome is in the workplace. […]

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Supreme Court of Canada Weighs in on Drug and Alcohol Dependency Disclosure Policies in the Workplace

Drug and alcohol addiction has been recognized as a disability in both Federal and Provincial human rights legislations. This means that, generally speaking, firing someone for an addiction to drugs or alcohol could violate their rights. In Stewart v. Elk Valley Coal Corp. the Supreme Court of Canada had the opportunity to weigh in on […]

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Ontario Court of Appeal Weighs in on Payment in Lieu of Notice Requirements During Probationary Periods

Probationary periods, during which new hires are assessed on their ability to fulfill the functions of a job, are a common feature in many workplaces. There can, however, be confusion as to what type of notice of termination is required when an employer fires a probationary employee without cause – an issue the Ontario Court […]

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Employer’s Hard Hat Policy Holds Up Against Religious Discrimination Claim

The line between religious freedom and occupational heath and safety can be a blurry one, as evidenced in a recent Quebec Superior Court decision where three Sikh men (the employees) brought a claim against their employer who would not allow them to work without hard hats on. A new policy and a refusal to comply […]

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