Supreme Court of Canada Weighs in on Drug and Alcohol Dependency Disclosure Policies in the Workplace

Drug and alcohol addiction has been recognized as a disability in both Federal and Provincial human rights legislations. This means that, generally speaking, firing someone for an addiction to drugs or alcohol could violate their rights. In Stewart v. Elk Valley Coal Corp. the Supreme Court of Canada had the opportunity to weigh in on […]

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Employer’s Hard Hat Policy Holds Up Against Religious Discrimination Claim

The line between religious freedom and occupational heath and safety can be a blurry one, as evidenced in a recent Quebec Superior Court decision where three Sikh men (the employees) brought a claim against their employer who would not allow them to work without hard hats on. A new policy and a refusal to comply […]

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10 Sick Days a Year Without a Doctor’s Note Might Make Being Sick a lot Easier

The Ontario government’s plans to introduce new workplace reform law could have a significant impact on how employees take sick days by allowing them to take up to 10 sick days per year without having to provide a note from a doctor. Sick Days are a Privilege Today Staying home sick isn’t always easy. Many […]

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Court Rules in Favour of Employer Who Provided Negative Reference

In its decision of Papp v. Stokes, the Ontario Superior Court of Justice has provided a valuable lesson to both employers and employees in what can be shared when a potential employer contacts a former employer to conduct a reference check. Terminated Without Cause The Employee worked as an economist with the Employer, who owned […]

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